“Holy Spirit Fiyah” (song from Hawaii)

This call-and-response song is from the December 31, 2015, morning session of the Urbana student missions conference in St. Louis, Missouri. It’s performed by the University of Hawaii’s Hui Poly student group, a ministry of InterVarsity Hawai‘i geared toward Pasifika Christians, along with some new conference friends. The song (and ministry) leader is Moanike’ala Nanod-Sitch, who establishes the rhythm on the djembe and issues the calls. She is the pastor of Ka ‘Ohana o ke Aloha church in Kaneohe and is of Native Hawaiian, Chinese, Japanese, and Ukrainian descent.

The first half of the song is in English (lyrics below), but starting at 3:51, the singers launch into seven different Polynesian or Native American languages: Yup’ik, ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i (Hawaiian), Fijan, Tongan, Samoan, Hawaiian Pidgin, and Lakota. Subtitles are included in the video. There’s also dancing!

Holy Spirit, come (Holy Spirit, come)
Won’t you rain down (Rain down)
Rain down (Rain down)

Come like fiyah, come like flames
Come like thundah, come like rain
Won’t you rain down (Rain down)
Rain down (Rain down)

Fill us up, fill our cup
Fill us up, fill our cup
Won’t you rain down (Rain down)
Rain down (Rain down)

We want more, we want more
We want more, we want more
Won’t you rain down (Rain down)
Rain down (Rain down)

Till we overflow
Till we overflow
Won’t you rain down (Rain down)
Rain down (Rain down)

The Son of righteousness will rise
With healing in his wings
We will be free
And dance before our king
Let your kingdom come
And let your will be done
Here on earth as it is
In heaven (In heaven)
In heaven (In heaven)

We will walk in your love
As we advance your kingdom
Bringing your word
To every nation
Let your kingdom come
And let your will be done
Here on earth as it is
In heaven (In heaven)
In heaven (In heaven)

To view other video content from Urbana 15, including songs and sermons, see https://2100.intervarsity.org/resource-keyword/urbana-15. Urbana has been held triennially since 1946, and its worship always demonstrates a commitment to global multiculturalism.

Also, hear more from Moanike’ala Nanod-Sitch:

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